Powerlifting Training: Powerlifting Workouts Build Raw Strength, Explosiveness and Mad Power!

Are you ready to a set a personal record(PR) in 3 of the most taxing, intense, popular lifts that show your true level of strength? Powerlifting is a sport, and the goal is to compete against yourself and with others to see who's the most powerful individual in their class.

It all begins with the Squat, a good way to break the ice and settle into the meet. It'll take a lot out of you, but if you do a good job with the squat, this will give you the confidence and momentum to go into your next lift.

Now you get a break from standing and get to lie down for the Bench Press, a crowd favorite that helps you get a lot of cheers and attention from the audience. Next up, just after you've poured your heart and soul into 6 maximum effort lifts, its time to Deadlift. Probably the most exhausting out of all 3 lifts, the meet isn't over until the bar pounds on the floor.

Training Basics

Bodybuilders individually focus on training each muscle group, while powerlifters don't specifically train any bodypart. Its not about working on chest, shoulders or tris, but rather its all about training to get stronger and more powerful on the Bench. Although these muscles get trained very well on the bench, the focus is on performance of the lift, not the muscle itself.

Training for the Squat & Deadlift is closely related, one helping improve the other. The Squat is more technical, requiring a great focus on technique and speed work. The Deadlift is more taxing, so a good strategy would be to focus on technique & speed with the Squat and using maximum weight with the deadlift, and then alternate this strategy back and forth as you progress. Remember, good leg muscular development is only the by-product, the primary focus is on getting as good as you possibly can at squatting and deadlifting.

Training Routines

For a beginner, there are countless choices of powerlifting workouts that it can actually be overwhelming and confusing. It doesn't help that sometimes the training systems can contradict each other, making the path to getting super strong even more difficult. From Westside to Metal Militia and Hybrid routines, what's a good way to get started?

First of all, focus on the barebone basics. There are simple principles that never change, forming the foundation of every good Powerlifting . When it comes down to it, the details aren't as important as the core principles, which is to progressively lift heavier and get stronger every microcycle(1-2 weeks) by either adding weight or increasing the reps.

Truly, there isn't a magical number of reps and sets that will "unleash" your maximum strength. The fact is, everyone responds to training differently, some people make very fast progress while others are slower to respond. For some individuals, a slightly lower volume works better while others need a slighly higher volume. The most important thing is attitude and committment. If you have an attitude to succeeed and are committed to put in the hard work, that will trump any special rep & set scheme out there.

When it comes to award-winning powerlifters, they pretty much focus on low reps and low sets while minimizing assitance work. The methods are pretty basic and old-school, but the difference lies in how much effort they put into each workout and how consistent they are over the long term.

5x5 Powerlifting Workout

For the beginner, a basic 5x5 routine is a great place to start, focusing on the core lifts with some assistance work. Training systems like Westside and Metal Militia are a bit more specialized and can lead to injuries and improper form if the lifter is not seasoned enough. With the 5x5 routine, you can really focus on getting the proper form down for the core lifts and make continued progress with a relatively low volume. The most critical factor is to practice each lift like crazy.

Monday

Barbell Squat
5 sets x 5 reps with the same weight
Start with a weight that you can do for 12-15 reps and increase the weight by 5-10 pounds each week.

Front Squat
3 sets x 8-10 reps
Add 5-10 pounds each week

Seated Calf Raise
3-4 sets to failure
Increase weight by 5 pounds each week

Wednesday

Barbell Bench Press
5 sets x 5 reps with the same weight
Start with a weight that you can do for 12-15 reps and increase the weight by 5-10 pounds each week.

Overhead Dumbbell Press
2 sets x 8-10 reps
Add 5 pounds as often as you can, this may not be weekly.

Close-Grip Barbell Bench Press
3 sets of 6-8 reps
Increase weight by 5 pounds each week

Friday

Barbell Deadlift
5 sets x 5 reps with the same weight
Start with a weight that you can do for 12-15 reps and increase the weight by 5-10 pounds each week.

Upright Barbell Row
2 sets of 6-8 reps
Add 5 pounds as often as you can, this may not be weekly.

Hyperextensions (Back Extensions)
2 sets of 12-15 reps
These are for strengthening of the lower back and preventing injuries (use a light weight and don't go to failure).

Barbell Curl
5 sets x 5 reps with the same weight
Start with a weight that you can do for 12-15 reps and increase the weight by 5-10 pounds each week.

The above routine is designed to be simple and easy to follow, although it'll still be difficult to complete each workout. The purpose is to learn the core lifts and make progress each week by getting stronger. Practicing all these lifts will train your central nervous system to become efficient at performing these specific movements.